Johannes Vermeer (1632-1675)Woman in Blue Reading a LetterOil on canvas1663-166439.1 x 46.6 cmRijksmuseum (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
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"How does an artist see beyond the distractions of faces and clothes to hint at the hidden world of thoughts and emotions? In his painting, the 17th-century Dutch artist Johannes Vermeer achieves this by depicting the most private of all cultural acts: reading.
The letter reader may be studying a love letter – that’s what we feel from her deep absorption in its contents. Or she may be reading news from a war, for the map behind her suggests navies and armies and campaigns. But what holds us is the act of reading itself, and the look it gives the reader: she is in another world, unaware of the colours and details of the scene that attract us. For her, only the words on that sheet of paper exist.
This painting stops time. Looking at it you are drawn into the reader’s rapt moment, and forget the beauty of the scene. It invites everyone who looks at it to share this silent, absorbed moment of reading.”
The Guardian

Johannes Vermeer (1632-1675)
Woman in Blue Reading a Letter
Oil on canvas
1663-1664
39.1 x 46.6 cm
Rijksmuseum (Amsterdam, Netherlands)

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"How does an artist see beyond the distractions of faces and clothes to hint at the hidden world of thoughts and emotions? In his painting, the 17th-century Dutch artist Johannes Vermeer achieves this by depicting the most private of all cultural acts: reading.

The letter reader may be studying a love letter – that’s what we feel from her deep absorption in its contents. Or she may be reading news from a war, for the map behind her suggests navies and armies and campaigns. But what holds us is the act of reading itself, and the look it gives the reader: she is in another world, unaware of the colours and details of the scene that attract us. For her, only the words on that sheet of paper exist.

This painting stops time. Looking at it you are drawn into the reader’s rapt moment, and forget the beauty of the scene. It invites everyone who looks at it to share this silent, absorbed moment of reading.”

The Guardian

howmanygoodbooks asked:

Hello! Did you return from your trip to Italy recently? Was it enlightening? I really enjoy your posts, hope you had a great time there!

Hello!

Yes, I returned last week and I already miss everything.. Pavia is such a peaceful little city, and I had the opportunity to visit lots of museums and galleries in Milano. One amazing experience was to be able to see the milanese Duomo from a different perspective, which is from inside the awesome ‘museo del novecento’. I’ve discovered that there are also many ‘palazzi’, owned by historical rich families supporters of art where you can visit, sometimes for free. In those places, I ‘got used to’ be amazed not only by the paintings displayed but also by the elegant interiors.

Thanks for your message!